“We Saw The First Spade of Earth Turned” – virtual tour

Selected images from our our current exhibit, on display in Gallery 1. All images used with permission of the Daughters of Charity Provincial Archives. If you wish to see the complete exhibit, it is open to the public Wednesday afternoons from 1:00 to 4:30 and will be on display through January 9, 2015.

View and download the exhibit brochure.
View a video featuring memories of three Sisters who moved into the building in 1964.

Design drawing by Maguolo and Quick, architects for the Provincial House, showing three wings which were never built.

Design drawing by Maguolo and Quick, architects for the Provincial House, showing three wings which were never built.

Provincial House under construction, May 1963

Provincial House under construction, May 1963

Provincial House groundbreaking

Sister Isabel Toohey, Visitatrix, breaks ground for the new St. Joseph’s Provincial House

Groundbreaking for St. Joseph's Provincial House. As part of the groundbreaking the Sisters processed around the campus and broke ground at a number of different spots.

Groundbreaking for St. Joseph’s Provincial House. As part of the groundbreaking the Sisters processed from the old Central House to the site of the new Provincial House.

Aerial view of the former Central House and St. Joseph's College

Aerial view of the former Central House and St. Joseph’s College

Chapel at St. Joseph's Central House. The chapel still stands; it is now on the property owned by FEMA located just south of our current campus.

Chapel at St. Joseph’s Central House. The chapel still stands; it is now on the property owned by FEMA located just south of our current campus.


Campus scene showing St. Joseph's Provincial House and grounds. At the time of the move to the Provincial House, the grounds had little landscaping; Sisters remembered getting red mud on their shoes when they went for walks.

Campus scene showing St. Joseph’s Provincial House and grounds. At the time of the move to the Provincial House, the grounds had little landscaping; Sisters remembered getting red mud on their shoes when they went for walks.

A distinctive feature of the building was its long corridors, such as this one looking down F wing toward the Basilica.

A distinctive feature of the new building was its long corridors, such as this one looking down F wing toward the Basilica. Because the corridors looked so similar, getting lost was a frequent occurrence.

Drawing showing plans for the Seton Altar in the Basilica.

Drawing showing plans for the Seton Altar in the Basilica.

Elizabeth Ann Seton altar. Mother Seton's remains were moved to this spot in 1968.

Elizabeth Ann Seton altar. Mother Seton’s remains were moved to this spot in 1968.

The Sisters' Chapel, now the Basilica, opened in January 1965 Sisters are seen here exploring their newly-completed chapel.

The Sisters’ Chapel, now the Basilica, opened in January 1965 Sisters are seen here exploring their newly-completed chapel.

Crucifix with double corpus

As originally installed the crucifix at the main altar in the Sisters’ Chapel (now the Basilica) had a double corpus. One of the corpuses was later removed in response to changing liturgical practices.

Sr. Isabel Toohey

Sr. Isabel Toohey, Emmitsburg Province Visitatrix from 1944-1962, began the project to build a new Provincial House.

Sister Eleanor McNabb, Emmitsburg Province Visitatrix in 1964, oversaw the move into the new Provincial House.

Sister Eleanor McNabb, Emmitsburg Province Visitatrix in 1964, oversaw the move into the new building

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3 Comments

Filed under Emmitsburg, Exhibits

3 responses to ““We Saw The First Spade of Earth Turned” – virtual tour

  1. Sr. Louise Grundish

    Thanks for sharing. It is a delightful video. Blessings. Sr. Louise, SC

    Like

  2. This is a wonderful work and truly appreciated — thanks so much!

    Like

  3. Se. Martha Beaudoin

    I remember that day well. We were the young sisters at the time. It was a very optimistic time when there were many sisters. But within 8 years the numbers of new sisters decreased rapidly and the building was not as full as expected. No one at the time expected that Vatican II would change things so drastically.

    Like

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