50 Years and Onward: The Establishment of the Five American Provinces

On January 4, 1969, the Daughters of Charity in the United States entered the next phase of their history.  At a mass con-celebrated by the former Superior of the Vincentians and attended by Superioress Mother Chiron, five provinces of the Daughters were created where formerly there were two.  The archives is commemorating this event with a new exhibit in our heritage room!  Explore the ceremony and the changes this brought for the sisters and ministries.  Our permanent artifacts, such as the famous statue of our Lady of Victory, remain on display.  Open to public and Emmitsburg campus 8-4 Monday-Friday (ring bell from outside or request entry at Seton Shrine desk)

On January 23, the Archives is excited to open its next exhibit on the Daughters history with health care in our second exhibit space!

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New Accessions from Holbrook, Mass

These materials will magnify the story of the Daughters in Holbrook, Mass.  The primary collection from this city is St. Joseph’s School.  Once the archives processes these documents, they will enhance this collection as well as fill in the gaps regarding the Daughters work in inserted ministries in the city.  The St. Joseph’s School and Parish collection measures 1 linear foot (2 standard archival boxes) and is useful for researching the local history of the area, Catholic education, and relationship between the Daughters and the greater Boston area and Archdiocese of Boston.file-66

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100th Anniversary of Armistice

The Daughters from the two American Provinces at the time served on the Italian front of the Great War as nurses.  They kept meticulous details of their experiences in the War to End All Wars, and the sisters at home were well-informed of the news overseas.

Annals of the Province of the United States, Nov. 10-11, 1918

Nov. 10: “In the afternoon a visitor coming from Washington brought the news that the armistice would be signed and that the Kaiser and other members of the Hohenzolle[r]n family had abdicated.”

Nov. 11: “The armistice was signed this morning and all fighting ceased at eleven o’clock. the cities are wild in demonstrations of joy – here we thought our celebration of last Thursday sufficient – the pupils had a holiday and a parade down the Avenue and they sang patriotic songs, made all the noise they could.”

Photographs and slides from the front are available to researchers, as well as World War I diaries and correspondence.

Coming Home - 1919 - 64A

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